Although much is known about Frederick Douglass, the once-fugitive slave whose speeches inspired many to support abolition, little is known about the final years he spent in Washington, D.C. Author
John Muller will speak about those years during a free Book Talk at TheManassas Museum on Feb. 24 at 2 p.m.

Muller’s new book, Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C., The Lion of Anacostia, explores the last eighteen years of the orator’s life at Cedar Hill in Anacostia. The ever-active Douglass was involved in local politics, aided in the early formation of Howard University, edited a groundbreaking newspaper, and lectured to benefit the poor. In an unusual twist of fate, he served as Marshal of the District and was responsible for bringing fugitives to justice.

During this time, his wife of forty-four years, Anna Murray, passed away; and eighteen months later, he married Helen Pitts, a white woman. Unapologetic for his controversial marriage, Douglass continued his unabashed advocacy for the rights of African Americans and women and his belief in American exceptionalism.

John Muller is a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, historian, playwright and policy analyst. A former reporter for the Washington Times, he is a current contributor to Capital Community News, Greater Washington and other Washington, D.C. area media. His writing and reporting have appeared in Washington History, the Washington Post, the Georgetowner, East of the River, the Washington Informer, Suspense Magazine and Next American City (online). His book is available at Echoes, The Manassas Museum Store.

________________
Patty Prince
Communications Coordinator
703-257-8456
703-895-6535
www.manassascity.org/facebook<http://www.manassascity.org/facebook>
www.twitter.com/cityofmanassas<http://www.twitter.com/cityofmanassas>
www.flickr.com/photos/cityofmanassas<http://www.flickr.com/photos/cityofmana
ssas>
www.manassascity.org<http://www.manassascity.org>

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather